Amanda hall wins early career researcher award

Dr Amanda Hall has won an Early Career Researcher award for her study that explores how tai chi helps to improve symptoms for people with low back pain.

The award was given by the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine (CTIM) and voted on by their international advisory board, out of a large number of high quality entries. Dr Hall's study provided initial evidence to suggest that practicing tai chi can help to reduce a participant's negative or worrisome thoughts about actual or anticipated pain; which in turn helps to reduce pain symptoms. The award is in recognition of notable work by a young researcher early in their career.

Dr Hall is a Research Fellow jointly based at The George Institute for Global Health and the Centre for Rehabilitation Research in Oxford.

Dr Hall said: "I am very honoured that this research study was selected for the early career research award in CTIM. This study was completed as a secondary analysis of my PhD work and I would like to thank and acknowledge my co-authors for their assistance and support on the study and during the publication process.

"It is important to me to continue to conduct and publish high quality research regarding the effectiveness and clinical applications of interventions, to better inform their use in evidence-based healthcare. In particular, interventions for persistent musculoskeletal conditions such as back pain, which is ranked as the leading cause of disability in developed countries globally."

Originally from Canada, Dr Hall completed her PhD in Sydney before joining the George Institute and Centre for Rehabilitation Research, at the University of Oxford, in March 2014. Amanda's current work with the Centre for Rehabilitation Research is about implementing best practice evidence for the management of persistent low back pain.