UNLABELLED: Eating disorders may be viewed from a transdiagnostic perspective and there is evidence supporting a transdiagnostic form of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E). The aim of the present study was to compare CBT-E with interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), a leading alternative treatment for adults with an eating disorder. One hundred and thirty patients with any form of eating disorder (body mass index >17.5 to <40.0) were randomized to either CBT-E or IPT. Both treatments involved 20 sessions over 20 weeks followed by a 60-week closed follow-up period. Outcome was measured by independent blinded assessors. Twenty-nine participants (22.3%) did not complete treatment or were withdrawn. At post-treatment 65.5% of the CBT-E participants met criteria for remission compared with 33.3% of the IPT participants (p < 0.001). Over follow-up the proportion of participants meeting criteria for remission increased, particularly in the IPT condition, but the CBT-E remission rate remained higher (CBT-E 69.4%, IPT 49.0%; p = 0.028). The response to CBT-E was very similar to that observed in an earlier study. The findings indicate that CBT-E is potent treatment for the majority of outpatients with an eating disorder. IPT remains an alternative to CBT-E, but the response is less pronounced and slower to be expressed. CURRENT CONTROLLED TRIALS: ISRCTN 15562271.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.brat.2015.04.010

Type

Journal article

Journal

Behav Res Ther

Publication Date

07/2015

Volume

70

Pages

64 - 71

Keywords

Cognitive behaviour therapy, Eating disorders, Interpersonal psychotherapy, Treatment, Adolescent, Adult, Body Mass Index, Cognitive Therapy, Feeding and Eating Disorders, Female, Humans, Male, Psychotherapy, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult